Archive for Evolution

Man After Man: The Coming Horrors

Posted in Animals, Books, Pictures, Science, Science Fiction, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 4, 2015 by Stephanie Selby
SpacePerson

Though the process of genetic engineering and grafting additional organs, the Vacuumorph is a being that can survive in the airless, zero-gravity environment of space.

Have you ever wondered what humanity’s evolutionary future might look like? In Man After Man, author Dougal Dixion speculates on the possibilities. From what humans might create with genetic engineering, to our kind naturally changing or adapting with technology, to how climate change may shape our descendants.

The results may leave you feeling uncomfortable at the very least. Just about every human-derived creature in this book looks pretty damn freaky. Then there are the ethics of genetic manipulation and our growing dependance on technology that leaves you wondering how far would people really be willing to compromise in order to continue the human race.

So let’s have a brief look, shall we? Here’s the timeline of Dixion’s vision of the future!

200 years: The Earth has been ravaged by overpopulation and pollution. Scientists have genetically altered humans in a variety of ways to live and work in harsh environments. Examples include the Aquamorph and Vacuumorph. Many unaltered homo sapiens are leaving the planet to find a future in space, yet there are still those that are left behind to fight for the meager resources on earth.

Aquamorph

A genetically altered human adapted to life in the water. This species was created for building and mining in the ocean.

300 years

The humans that have remained on earth have split into two major factions: those that highly depend on machines to maintain bodily functions and complete tasks, and handlers that work to repair this technology and serve the technology-assisted upper class. These handlers remain unaltered to retain versatility while working with machines. The machine dependent humans grow weaker and weaker over time, and the process of mating has become quite risky. The Aquamorphs have grown more independent, and no longer assist land-dwelling humans.

500 years

1000 years

2000 years

5000 years

10,000 years

50,000 years

500,000 years

1 Million years

2 Million years

3 Million years

5 Million

ParasiteManAlienMan

Unfortunately, the book is out of print right now so finding a copy may be a bit out of one’s price range but well worth the read!

Creepypasta Critique: Invasive Species

Posted in Animals, Apocalypse, Creepypasta, Monsters, Review with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 25, 2014 by Stephanie Selby
Kudzu is a great example of a real invasive specie, It's a plan that overtakes many areas in the American South.

Kudzu is a great example of a real invasive specie, It’s an Asian plant that overtakes many areas in the American South.

I think I may have created a monster…

A few weeks ago, I introduced my sister to Slimebeast’s short story “Invasive Species,” and she hasn’t stopped bugging me about it since. You may have already noticed that I’ve done a narration of the story as she requested, and now she wants me to give it a more in-depth treatment. I only oblige her because I’ve been struggling to find a good subject for this week, so we’ll all just have to bear with her for now.

It’s understandable why she would be so interested. In college she majored in biology, so the basis for the mutants resonates with her scientific knowledge – especially evolution. As humans with longer lifespans and generations, we don’t get to witness developments in our species in the same way as bacteria or bugs, which breed quickly and have shorter generations. Scientists often observe small bacteria adapt and become antibiotic-resistant or bugs develop immunity to pesticides. In “Invasive Species” the audience gets to see the results of human adaptation at warp speed.

Many people think that evolution is a process that makes organisms more and more advanced. This simply isn’t true, as the vast majority of mutations are harmful to an organism. It’s only tiny percentage of mutations that offer some kind of advantage. Natural selection chooses an organism’s qualities in terms of adaptability, survivability, and the ability to pass on genes to the next generation. This might mean that a species may have to become less complex in order to adapt and survive. One need only look at the dinosaurs; they’re the genetic ancestors of birds. Evolution doesn’t often choose intelligence as an adaptive trait either – it’s just a fluke in human development. In reality evolution is a real bitch.

What really leaves us both wondering about this story is why would scientists develop such a potent serum in the first place. It might be in response to an infertility epidemic but the true reasons are never made clear. I was at a loss in regards to an explanation. With some thought, my sister was able to come up with a theory: an alternative to expensive IVF treatments, as many people in first-world countries suffer from low fertility because of chemicals that can cause such issues.

The real question this tale leaves us with is simple: are humans really an invasive species? Were on every continent, encroach on nearly all environments, there’s over seven billion of us, and we consume more resources than any other kind of animal. Scientifically speaking, all signs point to yes.