Archive for CreepsMcPasta

Creepypasta Critique: Rusty Fingers

Posted in Creepypasta, Narrations, Review, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , on January 13, 2015 by Stephanie Selby

Lately I’ve noticed a distinct pattern whenever I write a creepypasta critique. Normally I’m gushing over the really good, well-known pastas, and share with you why I find them so enjoyable. Today’s going to be a little different.

You likely have never heard of Rusty Fingers, and that’s a good thing because it is a pretty bad pasta. CreepsMcPasta’s narration makes the tale bearable, but only just. I think the reason he did was because it takes place in the UK and there’s not many pastas that are set in his neck of the woods. In my opinion, he should have kept looking.

The basic writing is very annoying, especially in the beginning where some words are repetitive and details are scant. No idea who these people are really, the how close they might be as brothers, what they’ve been doing on their trip or why they even choose as their destination. Just that they have a room and have been staying there for awhile. It’s a rather careless way to write both characterization and text.

The only place where the author has any sense of creativity is the physical appearance of the villain and his mutilated, child ‘partner.’ there’s little explanation for why this monster is saving people or why his victims seem to accept this notion so easily. Whatever Rusty Fingers is doing to people’s minds it’s not enough to creep me out.

At the very end the protagonist finds his brother dead. Oh well, I guess. It’s not like the author gives us a good reason to get emotionally invested in him. *yawn*

Rusty Fingers is a great example of a bad pasta. The author had enough determination to churn out a very short story with a strange monster, but there’s clearly very little effort given otherwise.

Does anyone out there have a good story that takes place in the UK? I’d love to see some.

Creepypasta Critique: Chatroom 98

Posted in Creepypasta, Horror, Memes, Review, Short Stories, Uncategorized, Weird Videos with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on December 10, 2013 by Stephanie Selby

Chatroom98Well, it seems that I feel like discussing creepypasta again, although this will be a shorter engagement. I plan on talking about these types of stories on a regular basis in the future, so if you have requests for one in particular, I will be happy to oblige.

Chatroom 98’s author remains unknown to me, but the story consists of a teenager having a terrifying conversation with a strange computer program. You can read the original story here if you’re unfamiliar. A creepypasta narrator, CreepsMcPasta, also does a great take on this story, greatly improving the experience. Go check it out.

Now let’s begin!

If you have read it, you may find the tale to be lackluster. A stupid teenager named David finds a mysterious computer disk in his attic, and after a brief scare chooses to commit suicide with threadbare justification. The villain only has to show his face to somehow drive the teen insane, and for some reason the audience is warned not to go looking for Darwyn Clarke. I don’t know about any of you, but I’ve got an entire continent and an ocean to separate me from a specific attic in England that houses a red CD-ROM case. The story barely qualifies as unsettling.

Chatroom 98 also has some problems with basic storytelling and writing. The capitalization of certain words and sentences are supposed to be there for emphasis, but proves problematic for me because it makes me think of obnoxious yelling. There are even inconsistencies in the timeline; how can David be having difficulty sleeping for weeks if his encounter only happened four nights ago?

So, you may be wondering why I would want to talk about Chatroom 98 at all – I must despise it entirely! The answer is simple: I don’t hate it at all. I think the general idea has got some potential, and with a little polish could become a real gem.

The best thing about Chatroom 98 is its characters. David is very convincing annoying teenager, and the creepypasta’s tone matches well with what an awkward teenager would write. For example, I am completely convinced that a sixteen year old boy would type goofy, vulgar nonsense into a chat program just to see what would happen.

I’m also intrigued by Darwyn Clarke. Even though we’re given few details, his age, language and preference for theater suggests that in some respects he’s a classy, English gentleman. I’m also left wondering why he hated his sisters so much and why he became a computer program as a punishment for his crimes. There’s something about a man born over a hundred years ago becoming a form of modern technology that creates a great juxtaposition. I know that this lack of detail for Darwyn was likely an attempt keep an air of mystery and suspense, but mostly I’m just left perplexed.

I suppose my point is to send out a message to the author of Chatroom 98: wherever you are, please give this story another chance. Don’t let it go to waste!